What is kindness worth?

When my children were born, I thought a lot about the direction their lives might take. Could one grow up be a famous doctor who’d discover a cure for cancer or some other terrible disease? Might one prove to be a talented footballer whose goal in extra time would see Man Utd relegated after a particularly poor season? Was there a chance that I might end up attending the Oscars on the arm of one talented actor son or daughter who felt their mammy was the only person who truly deserved to be their “plus one”? Or did musical accolade await another whose fans would spend hours online trying to get tickets to their concerts that were destined to sell out in minutes?

And then the morphine wore off and I focused on the most important thing– that they would be happy.

But the world and real life seems to measure things differently. As any parent of more than one child knows, the same ingredients don’t necessarily produce the same results. Just like Bassets we have allsorts in this house – and I love that they are so different. Personalities, interests, abilities – all hugely different, and all contributing to the wonderful unique child that each one is.

And each unique child learns to measure themselves by standardised tests, sporting achievement and dramatic excellence. Hard work is valued and championed and success rightly acknowledged – but why are all things not measured equally.

Where is the value on kindness? We know that youth mental health has never been under so much pressure. We know the influence of their peers has the potential to be with them always. We know they have to find their own way in the world without us always by their side. But while it’s not a single layered issue, there is a fundamental change we could make – a change in emphasis.

We see lots of advice given on what to do if things do wrong but it’s reactionary and forgets that most important point – prevention is better than cure.

Kindness and empathy are applauded and celebrated when our children are toddlers and smallies, and though in theory, an ethos may remain once they go to school, as the years progress and the targets become more obvious it becomes apparent that excelling at kindness doesn’t feature to the same degree.

It’s probably not a deliberate omission, but how lovely it would be to see it as a deliberate inclusion, throughout the entire school cycle, recognising the different and yet same shape it can take as our children get older. A focus away from the books and the sports field. A focus on caring and compassion and thinking of others. A focus on words, actions and consequences and how to build each other up, rather than tear each other down. A focus that makes up as consistent a part of their education as their academic studies and sporting outlets.

And a focus that would surely lead to a lot more happiness.

Maybe when the morphine of achievement and competitiveness wears off….

Flowers for mum

 

3 thoughts on “What is kindness worth?”

  1. I couldn’t agree with you more. I’m always trying to show the kids how to be considerate and kind. But… isn’t there always a but I fear that the cliche, nice guys finish last, is very much a reality. I struggle to find the balance between being kind and not being walked over.

    1. It’s a really hard balance to strike when the laws of the jungle seem to apply! I suppose that’s why I’d like to see a real focus and value placed on kindness and consideration in school – the whole way up, so that children see this trait as valuable and as worthy of achieving as trophies and high grades. What’s not to gain from this? It can come from home but it needs to be reinforced at school – for the parents’ sake sometimes as much as the children’s.

Leave a Reply